The Kansas City Chiefs arrived Sunday in Miami, one week before their Super Bowl LIV showdown against the San Francisco 49ers.

It’s a week of game preparation unlike any other, and that’s why most of the game plan was put in last week at home by both teams.

But should any of the Chiefs want an idea of what to expect this week, they can ask Kendall Gammon.

Gammon, special assistant to the president at Pittsburg State, is the analyst on the Chiefs Radio Network. During his 15-year NFL career as a long snapper, Gammon played for the Pittsburgh Steelers in Super Bowl XXX in Tempe, Arizona. The Steelers lost to coach Barry Switzer’s Dallas Cowboys 27-17.

“It’s the Super Bowl. It’s pretty self-explanatory,” Gammon said. “There’s only two teams left, and to have the chance to put your hand on that Lombardi Trophy is a pretty cool deal. Knowing that you’re the only game that’s being played and everything that goes along with it, it’s just kind of surreal.

“I still remember standing on the sideline when Vanessa Williams was singing the national anthem. I remember audibly saying to myself ‘OK, this is still just a game. This is still the same game.’

“I also remember being in the middle of the field warming up and Joe Namath coming out there for the coin flip. He just kind of winked at me and said to get a win. Unfortunately, I didn’t follow his directions. There are a lot of things that stand out, just the pageantry of the game and everything going on and everything vying for your attention. It’s surreal.”

All players have media responsibilities early this week.

“It’s a little bit of a shock how much press you are responsible for,” Gammon said. “They have to be available somewhere Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Monday night is media night. It’s just a spectacle. There’s no other way to put it.”

Media day used to be on Tuesday before it was changed to prime time on Monday. Every player on both teams is set up at a table to answer all sorts of questions – football-related or not.

“I wouldn’t say that I got mobbed, but you get a fair amount,” said Gammon, an All-American offensive guard on Pittsburg State’s 1991 national championship team. “It’s intensified from the 24 years ago when I played. There is a lot of media there and they have questions, so you just kind of do it. It is what it is. My table didn’t have throngs of reporters around it like the quarterbacks did. All the same, it was OK.”

Team practices will not be that different this week.

“You go to practice, it’s pretty normal because that’s closed off,” Gammon said. “That’s probably the most normal thing you get.”

On the other hand, players may have a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity like Gammon did.

“On the Thursday night before the Super Bowl, we got invited to go to the Jay Leno Show,” Gammon said. “I actually ended up carrying Jay Leno out on my shoulders to open the show, me and two other guys (backup fullback Steve Avery and wide receiver Ernie Mills). That was fun being backstage and doing that.

“Being backstage, you’re looking over at Jay and it’s game time for him. He’s going over his monologue and he’s deep in thought. The director came over to me and said what I want to do is two of you put him on your shoulders and the other one be behind him so he can’t fall backwards and take him out there.

“Jay walks over a little later and says ‘what do we have going on.’ I told Jay that me and Steve are going to put you on our shoulders and Ernie will be behind you, and we’ll take you out on our shoulders, set you down and let you do your thing. He was like ‘OK, sounds good’ and then he was right back into his thought. It was pretty cool, pretty interesting.”

Once Sunday arrives, Gammon joins 26-year play-by-play announcer Mitch Holthus in the booth for the Chiefs’ radio broadcast that can be heard only on the flagship station 101 The Fox, its mobile app and on the Chiefs mobile app. Per NFL rules, affiliates on the Chiefs Radio Network are required to carry the national broadcast by Westwood One.

“I’m very excited,” Gammon said. “I was able to play in one. Unfortunately we lost, but I felt very fortunate to do that. This is just pretty cool. There are not many players who have the chance to play in a Super Bowl and broadcast one. I’m very fortunate with that and very proud of it.”

It certainly will be a high-energy broadcast that Gammon says is done without any quick-energy drinks.

“We do not drop a Red Bull, but sometimes it may sound like it,” he said. “We get pretty excited. Mitch is all-in, no doubt about it, and I am as well. It’s hard not to match his energy and vice versa sometimes.

“Mitch is iconic for what he’s done and how he does it, just a historian with everything he knows. You think of the Chiefs, you think of the players and you think of the Voice of the Chiefs, which is Mitch Holthus. That’s a pretty cool thing.”

JIM HENRY is sports editor of The Globe and receives correspondence at jhenry@joplinglobe.com. Follow him on Twitter at @Jim_Henry53.

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