The Woodward News

Local News

August 15, 2013

Landowners want trash concerns addressed

Woodward, Okla. — Flat tires, refrigerators in the road, plastic bags in fields.  These are all problems that landowners who live near the landfill said they are tired of dealing with.

A group of these landowners attended Tuesday's bimonthly meeting of the Northwestern Oklahoma Solid Waste Disposal Authority to share their concerns and complaints and ask for assistance from the landfill board in addressing the issues.

The landowners included Larry Endersby, Marcia Endersby, Tate Endersby, David Guthrie, Larry Miller, Lynette Terbush and Vic Terbush.

"A lot of the problems are from construction companies," Guthrie said.

He said construction material will often fall or blow off from unsecured loads, including everything from insulation which blows into their fields around the county roads leading to the landfill to nails that fall on the road, which their vehicles might drive over, causing their tires to go flat.

Miller said he has receipts showing over $200 that he has spent in the last 6 months to fix flat tires or replace tires that have too many holes to be fixed anymore.

He said he recently had to get all new tires for his wife's car after learning that "one had 17 holes in it."

And Miller is not alone in feeling the frustration from flat tires.

"Come drive my roads and feel my anguish," Lynette Terbush said.  "Feel my pain when I'm getting ready to go to work and I can't because I have a flat.  Feel my pain and do something about it."

While the flat-causing nails are frustrating, they're not always the biggest worry.

"When you drive down the road and there's a refrigerator in the middle of the road, that can cause some problems, especially if someone were to drive up on it at night," said Larry Endersby. "Something needs to be done."

In addition to the threats posed to human well being, Guthrie said the trash can also pose a risk to livestock.

He said that several years ago a piece of blue tarp had blown away from someone's load of trash and into one of his cattle fields, where a heifer he had purchased for breeding came across it.

"She started chewing on it and eventually got the whole thing in her and it ended up killing her," Guthrie said.

However, he and his fellow landowners felt that no one else really cares about the problem.

"Everybody's concerned about a little bit of public money, none are concerned about private money," Guthrie said.

Miller expressed doubt over anything being done to assist the landowners, saying "they won't do anything because they don't have to live it."

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